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Hunter Phillips
Hunter Phillips

Combat Wings Battle Of The Pacific Trainer Indir



The P-38J was introduced in August 1943. The turbosupercharger intercooler system on previous variants had been housed in the leading edges of the wings and had proven vulnerable to combat damage and could burst if the wrong series of controls was mistakenly activated. In the P-38J series, the streamlined engine nacelles of previous Lightnings were changed to fit the intercooler radiator between the oil coolers, forming a "chin" that visually distinguished the J model from its predecessors. While the P-38J used the same V-1710-89/91 engines as the H model, the new core-type intercooler more efficiently lowered intake manifold temperatures and permitted a substantial increase in rated power. The leading edge of the outer wing was fitted with 55 US gal (210 L) fuel tanks, filling the space formerly occupied by intercooler tunnels, but these were omitted on early P-38J blocks due to limited availability.[123]




combat wings battle of the pacific trainer indir


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The ultimate measure of airlift effectiveness is the ability to rapidly project and sustain an effective combat force close to a potential battle area. Threats to U.S. interests have changed in recent years, and the size and weight of U.S.-mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in response to improved capabilities of potential adversaries. This trend has significantly increased air mobility requirements, particularly in the area of large or heavy outsize cargo. As a result, newer and more flexible airlift aircraft are needed to meet potential armed contingencies, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide. The C-17 is capable of meeting today's demanding airlift missions.


B-52 STRATOFORTRESSThe B-52 Stratofortress is a long-range, heavy bomber that can perform a variety of missions. The bomber is capable of flying at high subsonic speeds at altitudes up to 50,000 feet (15,166.6 meters). It can carry nuclear or precision guided conventional ordnance with worldwide precision navigation capability.In a conventional conflict, the B-52 can perform strategic attack, close-air support, air interdiction, offensive counter-air and maritime operations. During Desert Storm, B-52s delivered 40 percent of all the weapons dropped by coalition forces. It is highly effective when used for ocean surveillance, and can assist the U.S. Navy in anti-ship and mine-laying operations. Two B-52s, in two hours, can monitor 140,000 square miles (364,000 square kilometers) of ocean surface. All B-52s can be equipped with two electro-optical viewing sensors, a forward-looking infrared and advanced targeting pods to augment targeting, battle assessment, and flight safety, thus further improving its combat ability.


C-40B/CThe C-40 B/C provides safe, comfortable and reliable transportation for U.S. leaders to locations around the world. The C-40B's primary customers are the combatant commanders, and the C-40C customers include members of the Cabinet and Congress. The aircraft also performs other operational support missions. The C-40 B/C is based upon the commercial Boeing 737-700 business jet. The body of the C-40 is identical to that of the Boeing 737-700, but has winglets. Both models have state of the art avionics equipment, integrated GPS and flight management system/electronic flight instrument system and a heads-up display. The aircraft is a variant of the Boeing next generation 737-700, and combines the 737-700 fuselage with the wings and landing gear from the larger and heavier 737-800.


P-51D MUSTANGThe P-51 Mustang was among the best and most well-known fighters used by the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Possessing excellent range and maneuverability, the P-51 operated primarily as a long-range escort fighter and also as a ground attack fighter-bomber. The Mustang served in nearly every combat zone during WWII, and later fought in the Korean War.T-6G TEXANThe T-6 Texan, built by North American Aviation, was designed as an advanced trainer. It was intended to be a transition between basic trainers and first-line tactical aircraft. The T-6 was used to train most of the Allied pilots that flew in World War II. It is known by a variety of different names, depending on who operated it. The USAAC called it the 'AT-6', The USN called it the 'SNJ', and the RAF called it the 'Harvard'.


Hawkeyes directed F-14 Tomcat fighters flying combat air patrol during the two-carrier battle group joint strike against terrorist-related Libyan targets in 1986. In the early 1990s, E-2s provided airborne command and control for successful Coalition Air Operations during the first Arabian Gulf War. Directing both land attack and combat air patrol missions over Iraq, the E-2 Hawkeye provided air control for the shoot-down of two Iraqi MIG-21 aircraft by carrier-based F/A-18s in the early days of the war. Later during the 1990s, E-2s supported Operations Northern and Southern Watch over Iraq. E-2s also supported NATO operations over the former Republic of Yugoslavia, including Operation Deny Flight. Recently in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, E-2 Hawkeyes provided critical Airborne Battle Management and Command and Control functions supporting numerous Close Air Support and Battlefield Interdiction missions. E-2s also have worked extremely effectively with U.S. law enforcement agencies in drug interdictions operating from bases both the United States and several foreign countries.


Combat in EotS is based on successfully bringing superior combined land, air, and sea forces to bear in a two-tiered combat system. The first tier is the resolution of air-naval combat, the second tier covers ground combat. The culmination of both tiers results in one side prevailing in battle.


U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joshua Cordova, 374th Security Forces Squadron NCO in charge of training, shares tactical points with Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


A Japan Ground Self-Defense Force solider assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division gives hand signal to his members before conducting a room clearing during during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


U.S. Air Force Airman Bryon Robinson, 374th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, center, clears a stairway during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Pollux Nelson, 374th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, center, and Japan Ground Self Defense Force soldiers assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, stack up as they prepare to conduct a room clearing during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


U.S. Air Force Angelochard Gascon, 374th Security Forces Squadron training instructor, demonstrates tactical movement to Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, open a room during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Pollux Nelson, 374th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, and Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division storm a room during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


A Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldier assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, conduct a room clearing during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


Staff Sgt. Charles Jaunich, 374th Security Forces Squadron flight sergeant, gives feedback to Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 1st division during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chase Cottrell, 374th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, listens to feedback during close-quarters combat bilateral training at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 2, 2021. The 374th SFS trainers welcomed members of the JGSDF to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operation between U.S. and Japan forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)


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